Posts Tagged iPad

Super-sized thinking

As the world gets smaller, we all get to share more big thinking.

It doesn’t get any bigger than the American Museum of Natural History’s launch of Dinosaurs :IPad.

Released to coincide with the holiday season, the app is something of a new media experiential coup. Extending, as it does, the thrill of discovering the Museum’s collection to a global audience.

Featuring over 1,000 high-res images, the app not only delivers to subscribers fast access to all the facts. It also enables real-time chats with other dinosaur lovers at home or even on an exploratory dig.

The really great thing is, this app doubles as a stunning advertising & PR device for the Museum’s forthcoming “The World’s Largest Dinosaurs” exhibition. Imaginatively created, to focus on a group of dinosaurs that lived for over 140 million years.

Given the popularity of the baby elephants at the Melbourne Zoo, a Jumbo app could be a timely addition in the very near future.

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How many tablets can newspapers swallow?

New research from Telsyte tells us that the Australian tablet market, which includes the iPad and Galaxy, could be worth $1.35 billion by 2014. Much of this growth will come from traditional publishers seeking to capture more readerships through the creation of tablet apps. But will avid newspaper and magazine readers be seen to swallow the tablets as vigorously as predicted?

Can the power of digital quickly topple the readership habits of a lifetime?  Time will tell. If it does, the very fabric of our world will be changed forever.

Gone will be:

  • The tabloid torture of the page-turner on a crowded tram.
  • The ink fingerprints on a long black.
  • The Saturday workout of picking up a slab of junk advertising lift -outs.

But there are downsides to this new age. We can’t see many spies in hotel lobbies hiding behind tablets.  What about swatting a fly with an iPad?

Also our furry friends would be denied displaying their loyalty by carrying home the morning paper. Yet, there would be more trees left to keep them happy in other ways. Which begs the question. Is the future so easy to read?

We think not.

 

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